PATHS (Practicing Art through Hide & Seek) Windsor: Sign up Now for this September!

PATHS

PATHS (Practicing Art through Hide & Seek): A Project Series by Andrew Lochhead – Sign up and Participate!

PATHS is part of an ongoing series of works and actions that explore notions of “play” as: an act of transgression, resistance, detournément, and subversion, a method of pedagogy, a means of investigating and exploring the urban environment & a means toward social engagement, in relation to the fine arts, – all within the context of our contemporary zeitgeist. Led by artist Andrew Lochhead, PATHS will consist of 3 games held at 3 locations in Windsor on September 20th, 21st, and 22nd.

Downtown (Friday, September 20th – 8:30pm-midnight) – Meet at Civic Space (411 Pelissier Street)

Devonshire Mall (Saturday, September 21st – 3-7pm) – Meet at doors by Tim Hortons (3100 Howard Avenue)

Jackson Park (Sunday, September 22nd – 3-7pm) – Meet at main gates of Jackson Park (Ouellette Avenue & Tecumseh Road)

Also, join us for a wrap party at 7pm at Villains Beastro on Sunday, September 22nd.

The game represents a fun way of engaging with an aspect of our city of which many of us are unfamiliar. We hope you can make it out.

Please use the form below to sign up for PATHS.


 

 

Reshaping Rochester: Transforming Spaces Lecture with Justin Langlois & Dr. Ian Wilson

Rochester

Reshaping Rochester Lecture Series – “Transforming Spaces” Lecture and Exhibition with Justin Langlois & Dr. Ian Wilson

Wednesday, June 5th, 7-9pm – The Little Theatre, Theatre #1, 240 East Avenue, Rochester, NY

Reshaping Rochester is an annual lecture series hosted by the Rochester Regional Design Center (RRCDC). The series focuses on the efforts, strategies and successes accomplished by cities that face challenges similar to Rochester, New York.

On June 5th, Justin will be heading to Rochester to co-present the final lecture, “Transforming Spaces”, with Dr. Ian Wilson, a radiologist and co-founder of Wall/Therapy from Rochester, NY.

To accompany the discussion and support the topics covered by Ian and Justin, the RRCDC is also showing a selection of works by Broken City Lab and Ian’s mural initiative, Wall/Therapy in the Design Gallery (1115 E. Main Street). The exhibition will be up until mid-June and includes a wide variety of past Broken City Lab interventions, publications, and other documentation.

Call for Participation: Regret & Resolve

tshirt-crop

With the start of the new year, we wanted to take stock of the regrets we have about the city or our roles within it, and the resolutions we might make to change this place for the better.

We want to ask two questions: What are the things that we know we should be doing, or wished we would do, or find ourselves scared to do, but never get around to actually doing? How can we take responsibility or ownership over our actions, or lack thereof, and find a way to be honest with where we should go next?

We’re wondering what citizenship looks like in a city like Windsor, and how we might be able to publicly and honestly articulate it.

Regret & Resolve  is a new project where we’ll be turning a series of resolutions and regrets into t-shirts. We’ll take online submissions from residents of Windsor and create a limited edition series of 50 shirts. Each selected submission will be made into two shirts — one for the author and one for our gallery exhibition. We’ll release all the shirts on the same night (January 31st) with an exhibition and exchange at Civic Space that will be open to the public.

We want these shirts to capture a moment of tension and hope in the city as we know it today and hope for it to be tomorrow. We feel like there may not be a venue to collectively articulate the responsibilities shared across this city, and that a t-shirt might be a good place to start. Printing these regrets and resolutions on t-shirts allows for a distributed conversation, a series of positions that we might take at the beginning of a new year, and a way to publicly talk about what we’ll do next. We’re really interested in an honest assessment of the things gone wrong, and the ways in which we might commit to righting them.

Interested? Fill out an online form between January 7-25, 2013 with your statement of regret or resolution. We’ll select 50 submissions and print them for the opening at Civic Space on January 31st from 7-9pm.


Submissions are now closed, see you on January 31 at 7pm!

Surrealism and Refusal – Gavin Grindon

For some artists, the systematic self-criticism of art meant autonomy-as-a-value comes to stand for something other than the production of art objects. The working role of the ‘artist’ is thrown into crisis. Avant-gardes often did not conceive of themselves as a vanguard of artists leading the way, but as artists refusing the role of artists.

via Journal of Aesthetics & Protest, Issue 8

Pg 113 Waking Up from the Nightmare of Participation

“…the specific openness or porosity of contemporary art for instance has functioned as a weird kind of hosting system: as a kind of asylum for various cultural forms and encounters apparently impossible elsewhere.”

— from Michael Hirsch’s Professional Amateurs, Outsiders, Intruders – On the Utopia of Transdisciplinary Work in the Cultural Field in “Waking up from the Nightmare of Participation”. ')}

pg 92, Afterall Autumn / Winter 2011

“…making art entails a permanent state of negotiation with many nodes of the circuit network — so that reaching the actual artwork is only possible after outrunning mediator after mediator; layer after layer; ultimately, what can be considered an artwork is a cluster of multiple explicit interests, including, fortunately, the artists’ proposals.”

–from the article, “Post-Participatory Participation” by Ricard Basbaum in the Autumn / Winter 2011 edition of Afterall ')}

pg 228, the Nightmare of Participation

“Don’t wait to be invited. Otherwise things will never happen.”

')}

ATTC Calgary Day 6: Mapping Calgarian Kindness

Wednesday morning we set up for our last day of Urban Discovery with Truck Contemporary Art‘s CAMPER, this time stationed in Central Memorial Park. The theme for the day was “Finding Urban Sophistication and Warm Western Hospitality.”

What we wished to explore was the notion that Calgarians are on average a kinder population. We also were curious if there were any trends in the areas that these kind acts occur. Josh, Todd, Randy, and I handled on the day’s activities, while Justin took a break after a marathon work session on our upcoming publication (which we’ll be posting soon).

Before and after a visit from CBC Radio’s Karen Moxley, we cleaned off and re-used our blackboards from Day 4 with a new goal in mind: to find distinct examples of friendliness at street level. Although the park had far fewer pedestrians than Stephen Avenue, we were still able to get useful feedback from Calgarians, while at the same time allowing them to take a break from their busy day to recall previous acts of kindness.

Continue reading “ATTC Calgary Day 6: Mapping Calgarian Kindness”

ATTC Calgary: Projecting New Narratives of a City

Our work on ATTC Calgary with Truck Gallery’s CAMPER Urban Discovery project continued with a couple day’s break from events, allowing to focus on planning the remainder of our residency activities and starting work on our publication.

Tuesday night was our projection event around the edge of Central Memorial Park — an impeccably well-manicured green space in the middle of a downtown neighbourhood, and a welcomed surprise. A few logistical concerns aside (like having to connect seven extension cords to reach the edge of the park), we had a pretty ideal spot. A blank light-cemete wall always makes for a good projection screen.

The projections themselves were a series of text-based statements articulating of a set of narratives around Calgary that were originally based on the responses to our fill-in-the-blank statements and eventually moving on to real-time feedback and participation from those community members in attendance.

Continue reading “ATTC Calgary: Projecting New Narratives of a City”

INSIDE OUT: A Global Art Project

TED Prize Winner JR & INSIDE OUT from TED Prize on Vimeo.

A simple and gorgeous project from the artist, JR. I wrote about his last project a little while ago.

INSIDE OUT is a large-scale participatory art project that transforms messages of personal identity into pieces of artistic work. Upload a portrait. Receive a poster. Paste it for the world to see.

Everyone is challenged to use black and white photographic portraits to discover, reveal and share the untold stories and images of people around the world. These digitally uploaded images will be made into posters and sent back to the project’s co-creators for them to exhibit in their own communities. People can participate as an individual or in a group; posters can be placed anywhere, from a solitary image in an office window to a wall of portraits on an abandoned building or a full stadium. These exhibitions will be documented, archived and viewable virtually.

INSIDE OUT is a collaboration between the artist JR, the TED Prize and you.
[via GOOD] ')}